Bluebell Woods and an Enchanting Carpet of Colour

‘…she flopped to the ground amid the bluebells.
Her hands brushed the mat of flowers and she lowered her head 
staring intently at the spray of tiny bells.’
Beneath the Rainbow

Bluebell Woods and an Enchanting Carpet of Colour

Anyone stopping by my blog cannot fail to notice my love for bluebells. You’ll find them on my banner and on my first book cover, I’ve blogged about them before and they’ve been my favourite flower since I was small. Now I wander through Carmarthen’s Green Castle Woods rather than the Sussex woodlands of my childhood. The beauty, however, exists countrywide.

bluebells-green-castle-woods-the-last-krystallos-four

© Lisa Shambrook

Bluebells talk to me of spring, new growth, romance, fairies, childhood and innocence, and I look forward to them every year. The hardy flowers thrive in our damp climate amongst the woodland flora. 50% of our native bluebells grow in our woodlands and we stroll through their carpet of blue every April and May as their delicate flowers swathe the ground.

bluebell-woods-the-last-krystallos-green-castle-woods-2.jpg

© Lisa Shambrook

Not much gets in their way as they spread beneath our trees, but the Victorian introduction of Spanish Bluebells, as garden plants, have become a threat over the years.

bluebells-thelasy-krystallos-garden

© Lisa Shambrook

Spanish bluebells are stronger and more vigorous, and can easily crossbreed creating a fertile hybrid. Native bluebells have become protected by UK law and we’re encouraged not to grow the Spanish variety in our gardens.

bluebells-green-castle-woods-the-last-krystallos

© Lisa Shambrook

The varieties have distinctive differences and the hybrids lean more to the stronger Spanish Bluebell.

native-bluebells-green-castle-woods-the-last-krystallos

Native British Bluebells © Lisa Shambrook

British Bluebells (hyacinthoides non-scripta)

Dainty, nodding and delicate.
They have narrow stems and leaves, and arch like a shepherd’s crook with delicate bells that droop.
The bells only hang from one side of the stem, nodding lightly.
They have a soft sweet scent and are often a deep purple, violet blue and have creamy white/yellow anthers and pollen.
Their bells are narrow and the petals curl back at the tips and they carry fewer flowers.

 

spanish-bluebells-lisa-shambrook-the-last-krystallos

Spanish Bluebells © Lisa Shambrook

Spanish Bluebells (hyacinthoides hispanica)

Sturdy, upright and strapping.
These have a much thicker stem and leaves, standing tall and erect.
Their bells are more closely packed and their sturdy stems can hold more flowers.
The bells don’t hang they grow all around the stem and are generally a paler lilac blue.
They don’t really have a scent and their anthers and pollen are blue.
The bells are shorter and open wider.

 

whitebells-bluebells-lisa-shambrook-green-castle-woods-carmarthen

© Lisa Shambrook

Both are beautiful, but the Spanish bluebells that once grew in my garden are now restrained in containers, while I allow the natives to sweep, unrestricted, through the undergrowth. And every now and again I’ll revel in the white bluebells that show their nodding faces…

carpet-of-blue-beneath-the-rainbow-lisa-shambrook

Beneath the Rainbow © Lisa Shambrook

Here’s a fun author/writerly fact:
Bluebell bulbs and stems were once used to make glue that was used to bind books!

Where do you find your favourite bluebells? 

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Bluebell Woods and an Enchanting Carpet of Colour

  1. Let's CUT the Crap!

    Your bluebells are gorgeous. I do not know if we have any here. I am fascinated with any blue flowers because their color is so unusual for a flower–at least to my brain.
    An interesting post, Lisa. I had no idea there were Spanish and British bluebells. 🙂

    Reply
  2. Kevin M.Cyr (@KevinMCyr)

    I love how connected you are with nature. It’s really superb. Your posts always motivate me to go outside more and experience everything.

    Do you think that’s important for a writer? I’ve always heard the sentence, “write what you know”, and you must know a lot because of how outdoorsy you are!!!

    Quality post, Lisa. Thank you as always.

    Reply
    1. Lisa Shambrook Post author

      Thanks, Kevin, I’m quite outdoorsy as we walk our German Shepherd a lot and love the walks by the sea or in the woods.
      Write what you know is good for me and nature does appear in my books, especially a whole plethora of flowers in the first book Beneath the Rainbow.
      Thanks for popping over, Kev 🙂

      Reply

I'd love to hear from you...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s