Tag Archives: Forget-me-not

Be like the Wildflowers of Spring…

I hope you are blessed with a heart like a wildflower
strong enough to rise again after being trampled upon,
tough enough to weather the worst of the summer storms,
and able to grow and flourish even in the most broken places
(Nikita Gill)

Be like the Wildflowers of Spring... The Last Krystallos

As an author I notice detail, lots of it, and nature provides so much! My favourite few months for flora fall in April, May, and June. The ground wakes up and releases a prolific field of colour – predominantly pink, blue, purple, yellow, and white.

Ragged Robin - Red Valerian - Red Campion - Cranesbill - Rhododendron - Aquilegia - Herb Robert - London's Pride

Ragged Robin – Red Valerian – Red Campion – Cranesbill – Rhododendron – Aquilegia – Herb Robert – London’s Pride © Lisa Shambrook

Let’s start with the pinks, from the deep pink of the shaggy but beautiful Ragged Robin to the palest shade of London’s Pride. Hot pink Rhododendron join the usual purple varieties swathing the countryside with huge flowers covering their waxy, dark-green fingered leaves.

Red Valerian remind me of walking home from school, I used to pick bunches from the railway sidings to take home along with bluebells (I know you can’t pick wildflowers now, but I was about ten many years ago!)

Aquilegia, also known as Granny’s Bonnet and columbine, are favourites.

Geranium Robertianum was used for medicinal purposes, but now Herb Robert is commonly a weed, easy to seed and grow, and a relation of the vast geranium family.

Garlic Mustard - Wild Garlic - Cow Parsley - White Campion - Cuckoo Flower - Elderflower - Wild Carrot - Columbine

Garlic Mustard – Wild Garlic – Cow Parsley – White Campion – Cuckoo Flower – Elderflower – Wild Carrot – Convolvulous © Lisa Shambrook

Looking at edible wildflowers takes us to the Garlic family, both pictured above easy to find, pick and use. Elderflower is also becoming more and more popular in cuisine.

The Convolvulous flowers on neverending vines can hugely frustrate gardeners, but I adore them. Beautiful white trumpets that enchanted me as a child and continue to do so now, have become part of my writing, being enchanced to become huge moonflowers.

I’ve previously posted about Cow Parsley and Hogweed varieties, there are many and I love when they spread through the hedgerows like swaying white lace.

Gorse - Bog Arum Lily - Laburnum - Buttercup - Welsh Poppy - Cowslip - Primrose

Gorse – Bog Arum Lily – Laburnum – Buttercup – Welsh Poppy – Cowslip – Primrose © Lisa Shambrook

I don’t imagine there’s anyone out there who hasn’t held a Buttercup to their chin to see if they like butter… your chin will glow gold to show you do!

Right now, at the beginning of June the Laburnums are flowering all through our Welsh countryside. I hadn’t realised how many there were until I saw the yellow racemes threading through our hedgerows and trees. I used to have a Laburnum in my garden until it fell after heavy storms.

Foxgloves - Campanunla - Thistle and a Gatekeeper butterfly

Foxgloves – Campanunla – Thistle and a Gatekeeper butterfly © Lisa Shambrook

Another flower just about to flower near me is the Foxglove, and our forests are full of them in Wales.

I also love Campanula, and always notice walls covered in this gorgeous mass of purple. They seed and grow with abandon.

And as we move into summer keep a watch for the butterflies. I loved my summer a couple of years back searching out butterflies!

Blackberry - Valerian - Ox-eye Daisy - Snowdrop - Stitchwort - Wood Anemone - May Blossom - Daisy

Blackberry – Valerian – Ox-eye Daisy – Snowdrop – Stitchwort – Wood Anemone – May Blossom – Daisy © Lisa Shambrook

Some of the most beautiful wildflowers are the simple ones. Daisies will always blow me away with sunny faces in whatever condition, and I love the huge Ox-eye Daisies that grow in clusters and often swathe the duel-carriageway roadsides!

One of my favourite things is walking through woods and our local woods are carpeted with Bluebells, Wood Anemones, and Common Stitchwort.

Bluebells - Forget-me-not - Purple Vetch - Vinca - Speedwell - Bugle - Wild Violet - Ivy Leaved Toadflax

Bluebells – Forget-me-not – Purple Vetch – Vinca – Speedwell – Bugle – Wild Violet – Ivy Leaved Toadflax © Lisa Shambrook

Blues and purples fill our spring gardens and countryside with delicate flowers like Forget-me-nots and the deep blue of Speedwell.

Vinca, known as Periwinkle, is another favourite and along with many of these wildflowers are mentioned within my books.

Bluebells, my favourite flower, and bluebell woods have inspired me since childhood with simple bells and pure magic. I’ve blogged about them several times and weaved them into my books, and there’ll be more!

What are your favourite wildflowers?
These are mostly British Wildflowers – what do you get and do you have
the same threading through your native countryside?

 

 

 

10 Flowers that Embody Spring…

Spring has arrived and brought with it the first horticultural signs of new life…
feast your eyes on the beauty of Spring!

ten flowers that embody spring, spring flowers, spring, flowers, the last krystallos,These are the first signs in my part of the world…how do they compare to yours?

snowdrop, flowers, spring flowers, white flowers, the last krystallos,

Snowdrop © Lisa Shambrook

Snowdrop (Galanthus): I adore the tiny British Snowdrop, I look forward to its little nodding head and vibrant green marks. It’s a sign that winter is beginning to draw to a close. It generally flowers before the vernal equinox marking the arrival of spring in the middle of March, but can flower from midwinter on.

vinca, periwinkle, blue, purple, purple flowers, the last krystallos,

Vinca © Lisa Shambrook

Vinca (commonly known as periwinkle): This always delights me with that shock of purple spreading like a carpet of blue across the woodland floor and winding up tree stumps. In India the plant is known as sadaphuli meaning ‘always flowering’.

scilla, blue, spring, flowers, blue flowers, the last krystallos,

Scilla © Lisa Shambrook

Scilla: Blue seems to be the colour for spring, and the dainty, delicate Scilla peeps out of the bare ground in the early months of the year. It’s usually native to woodlands and meadows where I live.

chionodoxa, blue, star, flower, blue flowers, spring, the last krystallos,

Chionodoxa © Lisa Shambrook

Chionodoxa: Another beautiful blue bulb known as glory-of-the-snow also opens its petals in the early months, and produces some of the truest blue in all horticulture. Its tiny starry-eyed flowers brighten up the early months.

narcissi family, narcissi, narcissus, daffodils, daffs, sunshine yellow, yellow flowers, the last krystallos,

Narcissus Family © Lisa Shambrook

Daffodil/Narcissi (Narcissus): Perhaps the most famous spring flowers in every array of sunshine yellow you can imagine. Generally small narcissi flower first, heralding spring and paving the way for the daffodils and their huge trumpets of colour.

primroses and cowslips, spring flowers, yellow flowers, meadows, yellow, spring, the last krystallos,

Primroses and Cowslips © Lisa Shambrook

Primroses (Primula vulgaris) and cowslips (Primula veris): Meadow flowers that spread through fields, woodlands and everywhere they can. The primrose was Benjamin Disraeli’s favourite flower, and cowslips are my mother’s favourite. Hardy and one of the first splashes of creamy yellow as the days get warmer.

wild violets, violet, purple, flowers, purple flowers, spring, the last krystallos,

Wild Violets © Lisa Shambrook

Wild violets (Violaceae): As much as I love pansies and violas, I can’t imagine spring without the tiny wild violets that pop up from nowhere and spread through the garden’s nooks and crannies, and their colours are softly beautiful.

qxalis, wood sorrel, common wood sorrel, woodland flowers, white flowers, spring flowers, the last krystallos,

Oxalis © Lisa Shambrook

Oxalis (Oxalis acetosella): There are many varieties of oxalis, but the common wood sorrel is the one I love best. The fragile petals have delicate stripes in the palest of pink and remind me of fairy dresses. The leaves can be eaten, but are quite sour.

wood anemone, fairy wings, white flowers, spring flowers, woodland flowers, woodland, the last krystallos,

Wood Anemone © Lisa Shambrook

Wood Anemone (Anemone nemorosa): These white flowers can be starry shaped or have big petals like fairy wings, and swathe the woodland floor in March and April like a galaxy of stars. One of my all-time delicate favourites.

forget-me-not, blue flowers, spring flowers, the last krystallos,

Forget-me-not © Lisa Shambrook

Forget-me-not (Myosotis): Another true blue of the horticultural world. In a German legend, God named all the plants when a tiny unnamed one cried out, “Forget-me-not, O Lord!” God replied, “That shall be your name.”. These are truly unforgettable sky-blue little flowers that in a clump can look simply stunning.

bluebells, purple flowers, bells, bell flowers, wooodland flowers, the last krystallos,

Bluebells © Lisa Shambrook

Bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta): This flower becomes your bonus (number eleven) in this post. It’s my favourite flower and will have a post all of its own…but for now…enjoy another bonus of spring and the prominent blue that blankets the woodland in April and May.

Like I said…this is my little corner of the world, Wales in the UK…
how fares yours this Spring?

What are your favourite Spring flowers?

If you’d like to see more of my flower photography please take a look at my
Flickr page and The Shutterworks Photoblog

Forget-me-not…What I learned at Conference…

I don’t often do blogs with a religious theme, but my faith is an integral part of me and I have been so inspired by the talks I’ve listened to at our Church’s General Conference, that I needed to write about it…
I belong to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, we are better known to many as Mormons…
If you require any information about my church please click here and all your questions will be answered.

Twice a year we have a General Conference, where the Prophet and our leaders share inspirations and revelations and Gospel messages with us…I listened to the talks this year, with my family, and we came away inspired and spiritually blessed.

I learned, or maybe a better word is reaffirmed, that I am important, that I am loved and known by my Father in Heaven, as are all His creations.
This quote from Dieter F. Uchtdorf, stood out most to me from his ‘Forget-me-not’ talk:

‘Sisters, wherever you are, whatever your circumstances may be you are not forgotten. No matter how dark your days may seem, no matter how insignificant you may feel, no matter how overshadowed you think you  may be, your Heavenly Father has not forgotten you. In fact, he loves you with an infinite love.
Just think of it: You are known and remembered by the most majestic, powerful and glorious Being in the universe! You are loved by the King of infinite space and everlasting time! He who created and knows the stars, knows you and your name. You are the daughters of his Kingdom.’

His talk concentrated on five points not to forget, five like the number of petals on a forget-me-not flower…
1. Forget not to be patient with yourself. (We are not perfect and the Lord is well aware of this!)  2. Forget not the difference between a good sacrifice and a foolish sacrifice. (Am I committing my time and energies to the things that matter most?) 3. Forget not to be happy now. (Keep forging ahead with your dreams and aspirations, but don’t forget to be happy with what you have now!) 4 Forget not the ‘why’ of the Gospel. (The Gospel of Jesus Christ is not an obligation it is a pathway, seek out the reasons why.) and 5. Forget not that the Lord loves you. (God loves you because you are his child.)
You can listen to his talk using the link below…

I have also reaffirmed my commitment to become a better person, to be my best as a parent, to be patient and to ‘Wait upon the Lord’. 
Elaine S. Dalton counselled that the best way to bring up your daughter is to love her mother…to show her what to expect and desire in a future spouse…we’re doing alright with that one! And it works with mothers loving our son’s fathers too!
I loved Tad R. Callister’s talk on the Book of Mormon… ‘There is no middle ground…’ he told us, the Book of Mormon is either true or it is false. But the only way to know is to read it. A young girl was asked what religion she belonged to and told them she belonged to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints,
 “Oh, the Mormons,” came the reply, “I know about them, I know their church is not true.” “How do you know?” asked the girl. “Because I’ve researched it,” replied the other person. “Have you read the Book of Mormon?” asked the girl and watched the person shake their head. “Because I have, from beginning to end, page by page, and I know that it is true.” she explained. 
The Book of Mormon may be controversial to the world, but when you know how it came about and why, and if you read it and ask if it is true, you will know. It is the same with Jesus Christ. Many say, well, yes I think he did exist, and was a good man teaching good things, but they don’t believe he was the son of God. It stands to reason that if he declared he was the Son of God, as he did, and he isn’t, then he would be lying to mankind, so how would he then be a teacher of good things? It would undermine everything he taught. Again there is no middle ground, he either is the Son of God, or he was a false prophet. A fascinating talk.
And lastly our Prophet, Thomas S. Monson spoke of how we live now… the times we live in…technology has grown and diversified, but moral standards have declined. The 10 Commandments have become the 10 Creative Suggestions in the world’s eyes. He gave an amazing talk (Because you’re worth it! lol) which can be viewed below:
 
I love my faith…I love my relationship with my Saviour and I love how I know who I am, and that my Father in Heaven loves me dearly…I love how we have a Prophet on this earth today to direct us and I love that he makes me laugh and inspires me at the same time!